Russia Relocation

relocation

RELOCATION TO RUSSIA

As relocation experts, at Move One we understand how important it is to familiarize yourself with your potential new home before making the big move, and of course to have a seamless transition when settling in your new destination.

Therefore, to make your relocation as hassle-free as possible, Move One profiles a country every month, providing an in-depth look at Relocation, Immigration, Moving and Pet Transportation issues, which could pose problems for expats. This month, we take a closer look at regulations in Russia.

For additional information and a full video guide on expatriate living in Moscow, please visit our online Moscow City Guide.

Russia is the largest country in the world, accounting for almost ten percent of the global land mass. It is the ninth most populous nation with 142 million people, according to official census, living across nine different time zones and in 150 different ethnic groups. There are Ethnic Russians with a Slavic Orthodox culture, Tatars and Bashkirs with Turkic Muslim culture, Buddhist nomadic Buryats and Kalmyks, the Shamanistic tribes of the Extreme North and Siberia, Highlanders in the Northern Caucasus and groups of Finno-Ugric people in the North West and Volga Region. Its terrain ranges from Broad plains with low hills west of the Urals, vast coniferous forest and tundra in Siberia and snow-swept uplands and mountains in the Caucasus and southern borders. Beneath the ground Russia has by far the largest reserves of oil and minerals anywhere on the planet. In Lake Baikal alone, Russia possesses one fifth of all the freshwater on the planet.

The modern history of Russia is dominated by the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, a superpower that defined 20th century world politics. When the USSR was dissolved in late 1991, it was succeeded by modern Russia, organized into a federal semi-presidential republic comprised of 83  states. Russia adopted nearly all the prior trade and security relations that the former Union had, along with the permanent seat on the UN Security Council. Its recent political history has been colored by violent clashes in the legislature, armed insurrection and a violent struggle against Chechen rebel’s intent on separation.

Since liberalization, Russia has grown in prominence as an economic powerhouse centering on energy export. Its financial community is one of the most influential, and is home to the highest paid expat community in the world. The principle economic powerhouse and most populous city is Moscow, over twice the size of the next major metropolis of St Petersburg.

Russia has 1216 airports. The primarily hubs are Sheremetyevo, Domodedovo and Vnukovo in Moscow, and Pulkovo in St Petersburg.

Property Market in Russia

The city by far the largest, most populous and most popular with expats is Moscow with a population at last census of 10,508,971. The next most populous city is Saint Petersburg with 4,600,310 and then Novosibirsk with 1,397,191. The vast majority of the expat population in Russia lives in Moscow.

Moscow is one of the world’s most expensive cities to live in, and centralized western style apartments and homes will come at a premium frequently in excess of London or New York rates. Instances of expats renting rather than buying are markedly higher in Moscow than in most other major expat destinations.

With the liberalization of the economy, there are no longer any restrictions upon property ownership by foreign nationals, but the legal system in Russia remains highly complex from an outsider’s point of view. Full local legal representation and an estate agent with experience in dealing with international clients is essential for any purchases within the Russian market which is still heavily influenced by corruption and grey-market economics. Outside of Moscow or Saint Petersburg, the quality of the housing stock dips sharply. Outer suburban and rural structures will not be built to Western standards, and both material and finish will be poor, with little in terms of modern data infrastructure.

The current market in Russia is in the mid-stages of recovery from negative impact by the 2008 global financial crisis. In 2009, Moscow rental property rates decreased by almost 25 percent, and for industrial premises the decrease was about 20 to 25 percent. However, by the end of the year, rates in nearly all rental sectors had leveled out and several had shown signs of growth. Before the collapse of the market, there had been a great number of construction projects and new housing stock introduced, so whilst the market is considered to be picking up again, there is still a flat period projected to last at least the next two years whilst the over-supply is absorbed before prices start to climb.

However, the absorption rate may be hampered by government measures announced in early 2010 by Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, who revealed plans to improve housing conditions for the 77 percent of the population still living in soviet legacy apartment blocks. The government has purchased huge tracts of land and has green-lit over 14 million square meters of housing due to start construction in 2011, with proposals to approve a further 20 million square meters in 2012. The measures are to also include a subsidized housing loan program at 11 percent – it remains to be seen if this rate is attractive enough to counteract the growing oversupply.

Russian property prices are more sensitively and immediately tied into the general state of the economy than in most other countries, and the general economy of Russia is still sensitive to fluctuations in the global prices of oil and gas. International estate agent Knight Frank observed that apartment prices increased by 30 per cent in the year up to the first quarter of 2008 and then crashed in September, both times nearly exactly proportionate to the value of both the stock market and energy prices. Whilst prices have yet to regain their pre-crash stature, the property market did start to show signs of recovery as early as the first quarter of 2009 with a 3 percent growth.

Moscow is the focus for 90 percent of all expat property purchase and rental activity in the country. Not all of this activity represents actual expats in residence, as the city has become increasingly popular with overseas landlords, with annual yields as high as ten percent of value in select downtown areas and a general average of five percent elsewhere. Expats purchasing property in Russia should be aware that non-resident Capital Gains Tax currently stands at 30 percent.

There is a minority of expat activity outside of downtown areas. The ‘Moscow Region’ is comprised of districts immediately outside the city ring road, and are currently undergoing rapid development and have a small but growing stock of western grade housing. Further afield there are resort towns and developments around the Black Sea, notably Yalta, which are particularly popular in summer and winter vacation periods. Sochi, venue for the 2014 Winter Olympics, is undergoing a great deal of development and is commensurately popular with expat investors, but will likely suffer a significant drop-off after the games.

The Land Code was introduced in 2001, further liberalizing the property market and codifying Russian purchasing procedure. Expats buying a property will first need to execute a preliminary agreement, which exhaustively details the conditions of the future deal, outlines the list of necessary documents to be provided by the seller, and fixes prices. Once payment is transferred, both parties sign a sale-purchase agreement witnessed by an accredited realtor or notary. The agreement is registered with the state, acknowledgment of which constitutes actual transfer of ownership.

Rental prices in Moscow, and to a lesser extent St Petersburg, vary wildly depending on location and appointment. Current estate agent searches show everything from $600 a month for a Soviet era studios located an hour commute from Moscow city center to $10,000 a month for corporate apartments in downtown Moscow.

Rents should include basic utilities such as water, heating, and building maintenance. Charges for electricity and gas are typically low in Russia and will not constitute a significant addition to monthly rental costs. The power supply in Russia is 220V AC, 50 Hz.

Local real estate agents will charge a commission fee equal to one month rent upon signing a rental agreement. There will also usually be a security deposit payable to the landlord or the landlord’s agents equal to one month’s rent which rather than being returned will constitute the rent for the last month of tenancy.

Popular expat districts in Moscow are Ostozhenka and Prechistenka, Patriarch’s Ponds, Zamoskvorechye, the Savvinskaya Embankment and Arbat-area side streets, from Prechistenka to Patriarch’s Ponds. Ostozhenka is has some of the most opulent properties anywhere in Russia, and has earned the nickname  ’The Golden Mile’ . Only 30 percent of the properties  are in year-round occupation as the area is nearly exclusively inhabited by rich expats and traveling businessmen. For family homes the streets along Prospekt Mira are popular, due to proximity to international schools and the Aptekarsky Botanical Garden. Expat families also concentrate around  Zamoskvorechye and Khamovniki, which are far enough from the center to allow for houses with gardens, close to parks and embankments.

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Health Care in Russia

Whilst Moscow is essentially a modern major city with western standard infrastructure and services, its public health system has major shortcomings as a result of the turbulent privatization process.  Basic medical care is accessible, but many hospitals and clinics will lack common medical equipment and supplies. Expats should assume publicly available medical care is not adequate for their needs except in case of emergency.

The WHO rated state of health and life expectancy in Russia is comparatively low, at 62 years for males and 74 years for females. The low health index and early mortality age is attributed to ‘preventable causes’, specifically alcohol poisoning, smoking, traffic accidents, and violent crime.

As a result of the high mortality amongst working-age males, and the effects of the extremely high casualty rate amongst Russian soldiers in World War II, there are 0.85 males to every female.

The state of Russian health is in part attributed to the physical and psychological traumas of post-soviet transition during the 1990s, leaving a legacy of poor physical and mental health and unhealthy dietary and lifestyle habits. Whilst the elderly demographic has a significantly higher mortality rate than Western Europe, the population is still growing older on average and births are declining. Deaths associated with HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and cancer have increased year on year for almost two decades. In 2009, life expectancy estimated at birth was 59 for men and 73 for women. Discounting immigration, the Russian population is projected to decrease by more than 30 percent over the next five decades.

Major health reforms have been implemented by the Russian government, first launched in 2007 by President Vladimir Putin. The various measures are aimed at increasing life expectancy, reducing mortality, increasing the birth rate, and overall improving the population’s health. The President himself featured in a campaign extolling the virtues of his own physical activities, including judo and horse-riding.

Some of the programs seem to have met with a measure of success, such as the National Priority Health Project incorporating ‘mother’s capital’ grants which have since 2007 managed to halve the level of population decline. The government has also invested heavily in smoking and alcohol abuse prevention programs, and has joined the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

The major non-lifestyle-associated health risks in Russia are from Poliomyelitis, Dysentery, Hepatitis A, Diphtheria, Tick-borne Typhus, Encephalitis and Lyme disease, Tuberculosis, Leishmaniasis, Meningitis and Rabies.

There are very few reports amongst the expat community of any of the above affecting more than a statistically average proportion, but it is important to have the state-recommended immunizations and appropriate health precautions.

Foreign nationals entering Russia will need to show evidence of comprehensive medical insurance as a pre-requisite to being issued with a visa, and must maintain health insurance cover for the duration of their stay. Cash payments for western-standard private medical treatments in Moscow or St Petersburg will be expensive, with a single consult costing upwards of $120.

Western-standard medical facilities in Moscow

European Medical Center
+7 095 933-6655 (Emergency)

International SOS Clinic
+7-095 937-5760
+7-095 937-6477 (Emergency)

Russian-American Family Medicine Center
+7 095 250-0646

American Clinic in Moscow
Tel: +7 495 937-5757

American Hospital of Moscow
+7 495 933-7700

European Dental Center
+7 495 933-6655

European Medical Center
+7 495 933-6655

Western-standard medical facilities in St. Petersburg

The American Clinic
Tel: +7 812 740-2090

Andros Clinic
+7 812 235-1487

MEDEM International Clinic & Hospital
+7 812 336-3333

Admiralteyskie Verfi Medical Centre
+ 8 812 713 68 36

American Medical Clinic
+ 7 812 740 2090

Andros Clinic
+ 7 812 235 1487

British American Family Practice
+ 7 812 327 6030

MEDEM International Clinic
+ 7 812 336 3333

Regional Clinical Hospital
+ 7 812 592 3016

Scandinavia Clinic
+ 7 812 336 77 77

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Cost of Living in Russia

The following list will give you an idea of prices and cost of living in Moscow and St. Petersburg:

Product

Price ($ USD)

Moscow

Local Currency (Ruble)

Moscow

Price ($ USD)

St. Petersburg

Local Currency (Ruble)

St. Petersburg

Restaurants
Meal for 2, Inexpensive Restaurant
$42,86
1200
$35,71
1000
Meal for 2, Mid-range Restaurant
$89,29
2500
$71,43
2000
McDonald’s BigMac
$2,68
75
$2,50
70
Medium Latte @ Starbucks/Costa
$7,54
211
$7,14
200
Consumables
Fresh Milk (1 liter)
$1,61
45
$1,43
40
Eggs (Dozen)
$1,43
40
$1,25
35
Sugar (1 kg)
$1,61
45
$1,50
42
Tomatoes (1 kg)
$4,64
130
$4,29
120
Chciken filet (1 kg)
$7,14
200
$6,79
190
Apples (1 kg)
$3,21
90
$2,86
80
Evian Water (1.5 liter bottle)
$1,25
35
$1,07
30
Domestic Beer (1 bottle)
$1,18
33
$1,07
30
Heineken (330 ml bottle)
$1,79
50
$1,61
45
Pack of Marlboro Red
$1,71
48
$1,61
45
Snickers Bar
$0,89
25
$0,89
25
Lipton Tea (25 bag box)
$1,68
47
$1,61
45
Transportation
One-way Ticket (Metro)
$1,00
28
$0,89
25
Monthly Transport Pass (Metro)
$43,93
1230
$39,29
1100
Taxi (5km, downtown)
$17,86
500
$14,29
400
Gasoline (1 gallon)
$0,96
27
$0,96
27
Recreation
Fitness Club, Monthly Fee for 1 Adult
$2 321,43
65 000
$1 785,71
50 000
Cinema, International Release, 1 Seat
$12,50
350
$10,71
300
Grooming
Male Haircut
$35,71
1000
$32,14
900
Female Haircut
$53,57
1500
$42,86
1200
Pair of Men’s Levis 501
$107,14
3000
$107,14
3000
CoverGirl Lipstick
$17,86
500
$14,29
400
Old Spice Deoderant (stick, 2.25 oz)
$4,29
120
$3,57
100
Manicure
$28,57
800
$25,00
700
Pedicure
$35,71
1000
$32,14
900
Household Goods
Palmolive Soap (Bar, 80g)
$1,07
30
$0,89
25
Colgate Toothpaste (reg. tube)
$3,21
90
$2,86
80
Johnsons Baby Shampoo (15 oz.)
$4,29
120
$3,57
100
Tide Detergent (Powder, 33 oz.)
$11,79
330
$10,71
300
4 x Duracell ‘AA’ Bateries
$2,14
60
$1,79
50
Windex Window Cleaner (32 oz)
$3,21
90
$2,86
80



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The Russian Language


Whilst ‘Russian’ is the official language, nearly all of the 160 different ethnic groups registered in Russia also speak a distinct language or dialect. According to the 2002 census, out of 160 million citizens, 142.6 million people primarily speak Russian, followed by 5.3 million Tatar speakers and 1.8 million Ukrainian speakers.

Russian is the most widely spoken of all the Slavic languages, belonging to the Indo-European family of languages. The earliest recorded usage of Old Russian (aka Old East Slavic) dates from the 10th century onwards.

According to the Russian Language Center a quarter of the entire world’s scientific literature is published in Russian, over 70 percent of all the world’s stored information is archived in English and Russian languages.

Within Moscow or St. Petersburg, it is possible, but not easy to get by speaking little or no Russian; signs will either be in Russian or at times in both western alphabet and Cyrillic. As with most destinations, a few social and polite words in Russian will go a long way to ingratiating yourself with the locals.

Language schools in Moscow to learn Russian:

BKC — International House Moscow

The Derzhavin Institute

Enjoy Russian

Extra Class Language Center

MGU Russian Language Center

Moscow Linguistic Center

Moscow State Institute of International Relations

Language schools in St. Petersburg to learn Russian:

The Derzhavin Institute Saint-Petersburg

Language Link

Saint Petersburg Polytechnic State University


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Education in Russia

The modern Russian constitution guarantees free access to basic education for all citizens, and as such, literacy rates are extremely high. Entry into higher and secondary education is highly competitive, with a traditionally stronger emphasis being given to scientific and technological fields.

Education in state-owned secondary schools is free and, providing certain academic requirements are met, the first year of university is also free. There is a proportionately high number of state scholarships for universities, providing free accommodation and even a small living stipend to qualifying students.

International schools in Moscow

The English International School, Moscow
+7 495 301 2104

Anglo-American School of Moscow
+7 495 231-4488

British International School of Moscow
+7 495 426-1320

Educational Centre Gamma #1404
+7 495 268-4686

European Gymnasium
+7 495 225-5201

Lycee Francais de Moscou
+7 495 514-1546

Moscow Economic School
+7 495 255-5566

Moscow International School
+7 495 304-3794

Moscow School 45
+7 495 126-3382

Slavic Anglo-American School
+7 495 134-5035

International schools in St. Petersburg

Anglo-American School of St. Petersburg
+7 812 320-8925

Education through Dialog School
+7 812 272-0360

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Climate in Russia

Russia contains a variety of different climates thanks to the vast landmass it covers, but with the bulk of the interior being distant from the sea, a humid continental climate is generally prevalent.

Enormous stretches of tundra and the extreme southeast are home to some of the harshest cold weather climates anywhere on earth. The mountains in the south deflect currents of warm air coming up from the Indian Ocean, while the plains of the west and north gives an open reach for Arctic and Atlantic environmental conditions . In northeastern Siberia is an area known as the ‘North Pole of Cold’ where the coldest naturally occurring temperature on earth was recorded at -68 °C / -90.4 °F.

At the other extreme of the Black Sea coast, most popularly Sochi, enjoys a humid subtropical climate with unusually wet winters and long hot summers.

Elsewhere such as the Lower Volga, the Caspian Sea coast, and southernmost Siberia possess a semi-arid, almost desert climate.

Russian citizens characterize the weather as only coming in two distinct seasons of winter and summer, with the spring and autumn as brief periods of change between extremes of temperature. The coldest months are January/February and the warmest July/August.
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Expat Life - Living in Russia

Life in a Russian metropolis, such as Moscow or St. Petersburg, is by now sufficiently similar to Western urban living that expats will likely be able to integrate into the city with little fuss or friction. Western and International foods, clothes and chain stores are prevalent and will provide familiar facilities for expats from around the world.

Of their experience of living in Russia, many expats have reported that one of the most common impediments to integrating is adapting to the Russian ‘mind-set’, an issue that sometimes causes stumbles and disconnects when least expected.

It is hard to overestimate the effect the massive upheaval in social structure during the last stages of the 20th century had on Russian attitudes and culture. Whilst the freedoms and opportunities of democracy are nearly universally welcomed, there has been abiding sentiments of discontent and dissatisfaction due to the worsening conditions for significant sections of the population, particularly the older generations. The social changes have also meant the worsening of conditions for pensioners, the collapse of socialized health care, the decline of many of the educational institutions, and closure of many of the social and cultural organizations through which Russian citizens identified themselves.

Tempered by a modern history of particularly harsh wars, revolutions, and regime changes, the fall of communism reinforced a general demeanor of austerity and suspicion of change within the citizenry. As such modern urbanites foster an unusual mix of conservative politics and attitudes, but at the same time have a great interest in foreign habits, cultures and fashions. It would not be unusual to overhear citizens nostalgically recalling the ‘good old days’ whilst using smart-phones and eating sushi. Expat bemusement at the seeming contradictions in the Russian attitude will likely be answered with a shrug and a phrase from the poet Tyutchev “Rossiyu umom ne ponyat”, which roughly translated means ‘Russia cannot be understood with your mind”.

Another attitude set that expats often find unusual is the mix of general hardship in terms of basic quality of living, yet a typically very high degree of education and in-depth knowledge of literature, history and politics. Attendance of theatre, opera, ballet, concerts and readings were until recently commonly enjoyed across almost every level of society, but the growing wealth divide has rarified many of the cultural activities that were once considered universal.

Expats who become friends with Russians should also expect to come across the concept of the ‘Russian soul’ as a catch-all term alluding to the unique attitude of the locals. Most charitiably this has been described as ‘a sort of melancholia or sadness born of oppression that demands a different social order’. When talked about less charitably has been described as a propensity to moan. The belief in this collective attitude is widely held by native Russians, and is both a great source of price and frequent debate as to its nature amongst the newspapers.

Whether as a hang-over from the paranoid days of the communist regime, or simply as a reaction to an often very cold climate, Russians will often stand much closer together and speak in a lower voice when talking than western expats might be used to. Touching, hugging, and kissing friends and close acquaintance is common. You may find this uncomfortable if you come from a culture with less physical contact.

Favorite Russian Pastimes

Weekending at the Dacha

A Dacha refers to a country house used during the summer months, and can be anything from a Romanov palace to wooden shack without water or electricity. The number of Russians that either have a Dacha, share one with family or relatives, or know someone who lets them use it is surprising. Come the first touches of Summer significant portions of the population will disappear into the countryside to help repair whatever damage to the Dacha has happened during the long winter and start preparing the shashlyki (barbecue)

A dip in the Banya

The Russian banya (bath houses) have for centuries served as a social hubs and wellness centers proscribed for curing all manner of ills and ailments. The heart of the banya is the steam room, which differs from the Finnish Sauna by being a hotter, wetter steam environment rather than the saunas dry heat. A distinctive part of a traditional trip to the Banya will be a whacking with the ‘venik’, which is by all appearances a broom of assorted twigs. Russians are known to drink beer whilst steaming in the Banya – a practice that expats should approach with caution and moderation as alcohol in such an environment can have a highly accelerated effect.

Swim with the Walruses

Ice Swimming remains inexplicably popular, wherein health enthusiasts and entire families ranging from toddlers to octogenarians jump into water so cold that gaps in the ice need to be cut. The practice dates back to pre-revolutionary times when the Russian Orthodox Church would recommend the activity as a way to expiate sins, the activity was taken up by the population at large and ice swimmers are affectionately referred to as ‘morzhi’ – walruses in Russian. Enthusiastic morzhi attribute all sorts of circulatory benefits to the brief sub-zero swims, possibly because anyone who jumped in with a poor circulation doesn’t live to tell the tale!

Russian Names

Expats visiting Russia, or anyone who completely lost the plot after the first few scenes of a Chekhov play, knows that Russian names can be confusing at first. Russian names have three distinct parts: a first name, a patronymic name and a surname.

The first and last names are derived in the normal way for western nomenclature, but the middle patronymic comes from the father’s name followed by a female or male suffix – ‘evich’ or ‘ovich’ for a son’ or ‘evna’ or ‘ovna’ for a daughter. An ‘a’ is also added to the end of the majority of surnames of Russian females.

When addressing Russians that you either do not know well, or are in some way senior to you, it is traditional to do so using both their first and patronymic names. Good friends will refer to each other by a pet-names, usually the first name with sounds like ‘-enka’ or ‘-ochka’ tacked on to the end of it. The syntax of these pet name is typically opaque to expats, who should simply be pleased that a Russian likes them enough to use one.

There are further formats of informal address, some with extremely complex derivations and syntax. It is not unusual for friends at work to refer to each other using a 19th century method of foreshortening the patronymic which would, for instance, change ‘Ivanovich’ to ‘Ivanych’. However, used in the wrong context or social situation these truncations are considered deeply patronizing, and expats are advised to not attempt them and just ask what anyone wants to be called.

The Russian Economy

The move from a centrally planned, regulated economy to a full free market model almost overnight in the 1990′s placed an enormous amount of stress of the financial institutions and the people of Russia. Dependence of short term borrowing, a taxation system that was changing almost daily, corruption and a complete lack of transparency led to the start of a major financial crisis by 1998. Combined with a crash in energy prices and the burst of the Asian ‘tiger economies‘ the ruble declined to only 40 percent of its value two years previously and the state was faced with an exodus of foreign investments, defaulted payments on sovereign and private debts, a breakdown of commercial transactions through the banking system, and runaway inflation.

Despite apparent certain doom, the Russian economy had tuned around by 1999 and entered into nine straight years of recovery and growth. Reforms were enacted in tax, banking, labor and land codes, and the energy prices recovered to levels higher than before. Household spending recovered, and exceeded, previous levels and Russia actually ran a surplus from 2001 to 2008. By mid 2008, Russia was sitting on a reserve of almost $600 billion in foreign currency, a third of which is now used as a massive buffer against unforeseen dips in commodity and energy prices.

Russia enjoyed a brief period in early 2008 when unemployment dropped to the lowest rate ever of 5.4 percent, and labor shortages were reported in the high-skilled sectors. By 2009 the rate had climbed back to over eight percent, and remained so into mid-2010. Unemployment is highest among women and young people and looks to remain at that rate for the immediate future, according to a World Bank report.

The tax system in Moscow is considered to be low to moderate. In Moscow, there is a flat tax in effect for individual income. The individual income flat tax  is 13 percent, and Corporate income tax is 24 percent. Moscow also has other taxes including a Value Added Tax (VAT), a property tax and a tax on transport.

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Public Holidays in Russia

There are a few Russian holidays that differ from western fixtures, mostly due to scheduling by the Russian Orthodox Church. Due to the Julian calendar all high holidays are 13 days later than their Catholic counterparts, meaning that Orthodox Christmas is on January 7, etc.

Russian state holidays include Defender of the Fatherland Day (February 23), Spring and Labor Day (May 1), Victory Day (May 9), Russia Day (June 12), and Unity Day (November 4).

Popular non-public holidays include Old New Year (January 14), Tatiana Day (January 25), Cosmonautics Day (April 12), Ivan Kupala Day (July 7), and Peter and Fevronia Day (July 8).


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If you are considering moving to Moscow, Russia, Move One’s relocation services include city orientation, home and school searches, immigration as well as door to door moving services worldwide and cover packing of personal effects, warehousing, pet transportation and fine art shipping. Should you need help with your corporate or individual relocation needs, or if you would like to receive a free moving quote, do not hesitate to contact us at relo@moveoneinc.com.




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